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SEND

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A - Z of Jargon



 
A
Annual Review: a meeting held annually to review the statement of a special educational need. Parents, school and outside agencies are all invited to attend.
 
Auditory learning style: children who learn best when involved in listening and speaking tasks.
 
Auditory sequential memory; the ability to recall sounds, spoken words and information in the sequence they were heard.


B
Baseline assessment: the assessment of skills before any teaching or intervention from which subsequent progress can be measured.
 
Behaviour Modification: a technique that aims to change behaviour patterns.


C
Cognition; the process of knowing, thinking and reasoning.
 
Cognitive ability: the intellectual ability to know, think and reason.
 
Co-ordination: the ability to perform complex body movements.


D
Decoding: the process of extracting meaning from written or spoken symbols
 
Developmental Delay: a term used to describe pupils who have not mastered the skills expected for their age.
Distractibility: the inability to attend to a task without being distracted.
 
Differentiation: adapting learning tasks to meet the needs of all learners.


E
Early Years Action: when provision is made for a child by the Inclusion team and the teacher that is additional or different from what is normally provided.
Early Years Action plus: when provision is made for a child by the Inclusion team and the teacher that is additional or different from what is normally provided. The child having been identified with an educational need.
Expressive Language: the ability to communicate, expressing thoughts and responses through writing, speaking or signs and gestures.
Eye-hand co-ordination: the ability of the eyes and hands to work together.


F
Fine Motor skills: refers to the ability to use the small muscles of the body for precise skills such as writing.


H
Home-school agreement; the written contract that is drawn up between the school, parents/carers and the child, that sets out expectations for attendance, behaviour and standards of work.
 Hyperactivity: the inability to focus on a task for a period of time and the need to be constantly on the move.


I
Inclusion: the word used to denote that children with all abilities and needs are included in a mainstream school.
I.E.P: Individual Education plan: the plan devised for meeting a child’s needs with targets for the child, showing who will help and what will be done.


K
Key stage One (KS1): children aged 5-7 (infants)
Key stage Two (KS2): Children aged 7-11 (juniors)


L
LEA: local education authority
Learning difficulties: refers to the specific problems a child may have with any aspects of the learning process.


M
Mastery folder: a way of teaching precise words , numbers or targets.


N  
Numicon: a multi sensory approach to the teaching and learning of maths.


P
P-scales: very small steps of progression across the curriculum by which the progress of children can be measured.
R
Receptive Language: the ability to receive and comprehend verbal language either written or spoken.
 
 
S
School Action: when provision is made for a child by the Inclusion team and the teacher that is additional or different from what is normally provided.
School action Plus: when provision is made for a child by the Inclusion team and the teacher that is additional or different from what is normally provided. The child having been identified with an educational need.
Self-esteem; how positively (high self esteem) or negatively (low self esteem) children perceive themselves within their environment.
SEN register: a list of children in school who receive additional support at school action or school action plus.
Sight words (high frequency words): words that children can recognise as whole words on sight.
Statement of special educational need: the document that is issued by the LEA which contains details of a child's educational needs, as identified by the local authority; it includes details of the provision required to meet those needs.
Small steps: this is a weekly Individual Education plan- a set of targets personalised for your child on a weekly basis supported by Inclusion support, class teacher and Teaching assistants in order to monitor all progress made by a pupil. This will be shown to you at parents evening and any meeting involving you and your child.

T
Thinking skills: the skills through which children acquire, interpret, re-organise, store, retrieve and process knowledge.


V
Verbal comprehension: the ability to listen to information, remember it, understand it and then use the information across a range of tasks.
Visual memory: the ability to recall information that has been presented visually.
Visual motor: refers to the ability to translate information received visually into a motor response. Children who have difficulties in this area often have poor handwriting.
 

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